Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Stormy,persistent weather pattern bleeding into a fourth straight month of soggy,deary weather for NYC area

Since the Spring 2017 season began,practically,the Jet Stream has been practically stuck in a pattern that has let the Eastern two-thirds of the US remain wet,stormy,raw and cool,although now that the 2017 Summer season has began,that may mean we here in the Northeastern US and the New York City area in particular are in for a stormy,soggy,steamy summer this year. Here's the High and Low Temperature and weather stats for the city of White Plains,NY for each day since April Fool's Day; April 1,2017,as of 12:30AM,EDT,July 20,2017 from weatherunderground.com







April 1:                    46/36          50/34               -4/+2
April 2:                    61/37          51/35             +10/+2
April 3:                    64/36          51/35             +13/+1
April 4:                    50/44          52/36               -2/+8
April 5:                    60/42          52/36               +8/+6
April 6:                    51/39          53/35                -2/+4
April 7:                    49/39          54/36                -5/+3
April 8:                    54/38          54/36                 0/+2
April 9:                    67/33          55/37              +12/-4
April 10:                  73/41          55/37              +18/+4
April 11:                  78/48          56/38              +22/+10
April 12:                  72/52          56/38              +16/+14
April 13:                  62/44          57/39                 +5/+5
April 14:                  63/41          57/39                 +6/+2
April 15:                  60/40          58/40                 +2/0
April 16:                  85/51          58/40              +27/+11
April 17:                  70/54          59/41              +11/+13
April 18:                  63/45          59/41                +4/+4
April 19:                  53/41          59/41                 -6/0
April 20:                  66/46          60/42                +6/+4
April 21:                  52/48          60/42                -8/+6
April 22:                  56/46          60/42                -4/+4
April 23:                  65/43          61/43                +4/0
April 24:                  62/40          61/43                +1/-3
April 25:                  56/50          61/43                -5/+7
April 26:                  63/53          62/44                +1/+9
April 27:                  67/57          62/44                +5/+13
April 28:                  83/57          62/44              +21/+13
April 29:                  84/62          63/45              +21/+17
April 30:                  64/48          63/45                 +1/+3
May 1:                     70/46          63/45                +7/+1
May 2:                     74/60          64/46              +10/+14
May 3:                     63/45          64/46                 -1/-1
May 4:                     61/39          64/46                 -3/-7
May 5:                     60/48          64/46                 -4/+2
May 6:                     64/52          65/47                 -1/+5
May 7:                     54/46          65/47                -11/-1
May 8:                     55/43          65/47                -10/-4
May 9:                     58/42          65/47                 - 7/-5
May 10:                   61/45          65/47                  -4/-2
May 11:                   60/42          65/47                  -5/-5
May 12:                   61/43          66/48                  -5/-5
May 13:                   54/44          66/48                -12/-4
May 14:                   64/50          66/48                 -2/+2
May 15:                   66/52          66/48                   0/+4
May 16:                   77/55          67/49               +10/+6
May 17:                   85/57          67/49               +18/+8
May 18:                   95/71          67/49               +28/+22       (Record High Set)
May 19:                   90/62          68/50               +22/+12
May 20:                   66/48          68/50                  -2/-2
May 21:                   67/47          68/50                  -1/-3
May 22:                   59/51          69/51                -10/0
May 23:                   70/54          69/51                 +1/+3
May 24:                   70/56          70/52                   0/+4
May 25:                   58/54          71/53               -13/+1
May 26:                   74/54          71/53                +3/+1
May 27:                   73/53          71/53                +2/0
May 28:                   70/56          72/54                -2/+2
May 29:                   57/53          72/54               -15/-1
May 30:                   60/54          72/54               -12/0
May 31:                   75/55          72/54               +3/+1
June 1:                     79/55          73/55               +6/0
June 2:                     74/50          73/55               +1/-5
June 3:                     72/50          73/55                -1/-5
June 4:                     70/54          74/56                -4/-2
June 5:                     64/56          74/56              -10/0
June 6:                     56/50          74/56              -18/-6
June 7:                     68/50          75/57                -7/-7
June 8:                     70/50          75/57                -5/-7
June 9:                     81/47          75/57               +6/-10          (Record Low Set)
June 10:                   85/57          76/58               +9/-1
June 11:                   92/66          76/58             +16/+8
June 12:                   93/69          76/58             +17/+11          (Record High Set)
June 13:                   94/70          77/59             +17/+11          (Record High Set)
June 14:                   85/59          77/59               +8/0
June 15:                   77/57          77/59                 0/-2
June 16:                   68/58          77/59                -9/-1
June 17:                   74/68          78/60                -4/+8
June 18:                   86/72          78/60               +8/+12
June 19:                   84/70          78/60               +6/+10
June 20:                   85/65          78/60               +7/+5
June 21:                   82/64           79/61              +3/+3
June 22:                   85/71           79/61              +6/+10
June 23:                   82/72           79/61              +3/+11
June 24:                   82/72           80/62              +2/+10
June 25:                   81/63           80/62              +1/+1
June 26:                  78/58           80/62                -2/-4
June 27:                  79/59           80/62                -1/-3
June 28:                  79/57           81/63                -2/-6
June 29:                  82/68           81/63               +1/+5
June 30:                  87/69           81/63               +6/+6
July 1:                    84/68           81/63                +3/+5    
July 2:                    88/70           81/63                +7/+7      
July 3:                    87/67           81/63                +6/+4
July 4:                    85/65           81/63                +4/+2
July 5:                    84/66           82/64                +2/+2  
July 6:                    78/64           82/64                 -4/0
July 7:                    80/66           82/64                 -2/+2
July 8:                    84/66           82/64                +2/+2
July 9:                    81/63           82/64                 -1/-1
July 10:                  84/62           82/64                +2/-2
July 11:                  83/71           82/64                +1/+7
July 12:                  88/72           82/64                +6/+8
July 13:                  90/70           83/65                +7/+5
July 14:                  66/62           83/65                -17/-3
July 15:                  82/64           83/65                 -1/-1
July 16:                  84/64           83/65                 +1/-1
July 17:                  82/66           83/65                 -1/+1
July 18:                  86/70           83/65                 +3/+5
July 19:                  92/72           83/65                 +9/+7




-Highest Temperature: 95 degrees on May 18
-Lowest Temperature:  33 degrees on April 9
-# of Highs above normal:   63 days
-# of Highs right at normal:  4 days
-# of Highs below normal:   43 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees above normal: 18 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees below normal: 10 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees above normal: 12 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees below normal:  3 days
-# of Highs at least 20 degrees above normal:  6 days
-# of Highs at least 20 degrees below normal:  0 days
-# of Highs at least 25 degrees above normal:  2 days
-# of Highs at least 25 degrees below normal:  0 days
-Rainfall: 15.42 inches
-# of Days of Measurable Precipitation:       46 days
-# of Days of No Measurable Precipitation:  64 days       (including the last 5 straight)

Persistent, unrelenting weather pattern has the NYC area persistently soggy and cool (relative to normal)

Thanks to a stubborn Jet Stream trough that has been in place virtually all spring and now into the summer,looks like the Northeastern US and the New York City metro-area,in particular,is in for one steamy,soggy,stormy summer of 2017.Here's the High and Low Temperatures compared to normal for each day since May 1,2017,for the city of White Plains,NY, in suburban Westchester,NY,as of 11:30PM,EDT,July 17,2017 from accuweather.com







May 1:                70/46           63/45          +7/+1
May 2:                74/60           64/46        +10/+14
May 3:                63/45           64/46           -1/-1
May 4:                61/39           64/46           -3/-7
May 5:                60/48           64/46           -4/+2
May 6:                64/52           65/47           -1/+5
May 7:                54/46           65/47          -11/-1
May 8:                55/43           65/47          -10/-4
May 9:                58/42           65/47           - 7/-5
May 10:              61/45           65/47            -4/-2
May 11:              60/42           65/47            -5/-5
May 12:              61/43           66/48            -5/-5
May 13:              54/44           66/48          -12/-4
May 14:              64/50           66/48            -2/+2
May 15:              66/52           67/49            -1/+3
May 16:              80/58           67/49          +13/+9
May 17:              85/57           68/50          +17/+7
May 18:              94/72           68/50          +26/+22   (Record High Set)
May 19:              90/62           68/50          +22/+12
May 20:              65/49           69/51             -4/-2
May 21:              68/48           69/51             -1/-3
May 22:              59/51           70/52           -11/-1
May 23:              69/55           70/52            -1/+3
May 24:              70/56           70/52             0/+4
May 25:              58/54           71/53          -13/+1
May 26:              74/54           71/53           +3/+1
May 27:              73/53           71/53           +2/0
May 28:              70/56           72/54            -2/+2
May 29:              58/54           72/54          -14/0
May 30:              61/53           72/54          -11/-1
May 31:              75/55           72/54           +3/+1
June 1:                79/55           73/55           +6/0
June 2:                74/50           73/55           +1/-5
June 3:                72/50           73/55            -1/-5
June 4:                70/54           74/56            -4/-2
June 5:                64/56           74/56          -10/0
June 6:                56/50           74/56          -18/-6
June 7:                68/50           75/57            -7/-7
June 8:                72/50           75/57            -3/-7
June 9:                81/47           75/57           +6/-10       (Record Low Set)
June 10:              85/57           76/58           +9/-1
June 11:              92/66           76/58         +16/+8 
June 12:              93/69           76/58         +17/+11      (Record High Set)
June 13:              94/70           77/59         +17/+11      (Record High Set)  
June 14:              84/60           77/59           +7/+1
June 15:              77/57           77/59              0/-2
June 16:              68/58           77/59             -9/-1
June 17:              74/68           78/60             -4+8
June 18:              85/73           78/60            +7/+13
June 19:              84/70           78/60            +6/+10
June 20:              86/64           78/60            +8/+4
June 21:              82/64           79/61            +3/+3
June 22:              85/71           79/61            +6/+10
June 23:              82/72           79/61            +3/+11
June 24:              82/72           80/62            +2/+10
June 25:              81/63           80/62            +1/+1
June 26:              78/58           80/62             -2/-4
June 27:              79/59           80/62             -1/-3
June 28:              79/57           81/63             -2/-6
June 29:              82/68           81/63            +1/+5
June 30:              87/69           81/63            +6/+6
July 1:                84/68           81/63             +3/+5
July 2:                89/71           81/63             +8/+8
July 3:                87/67           81/63             +6/+4
July 4:                85/65           81/63             +4/+2
July 5:                84/66           82/64             +2/+2
July 6:                78/64           82/64              -4/0
July 7:                79/67           82/64              -3/+3
July 8:                84/66           82/64             +2/+2
July 9:                82/62           82/64                0/-2
July 10:              84/62           82/64              +2/-2
July 11:              83/71           82/64              +1/+7
July 12:              88/72           82/64              +6/+8
July 13:              91/69           83/65              +8/+4
July 14:              66/62           83/65             -17/-3
July 15:              82/64           83/65               -1/-1
July 16:              84/64           83/65              +1/-1
July 17:              82/66           83/65              -1/+1
July 18:              86/70           83/65             +3/+5
July 19:              91/73           83/65             +8/+8







-Highest Temperature: 94 degrees on May 18 and June 13
-Lowest Temperature:  39 degrees on May 4
-# of High Temperatures above normal:   40 days      
-# of High Temperatures right at normal:   3 days
-# of High Temperatures below normal:    37 days
 -# of Highs at least 10 degrees above normal:   7 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees below normal:  10 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees above normal:    5 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees below normal:    2 days
-# of Highs at least 20 degrees above normal:    2 days
-# of Highs at least 20 degrees below normal:    0 days
-# of Highs at or above 100 degrees:   0 days
-# of Highs between 90-99 degrees:    7 days
-# of Highs between 80-89 degrees:  29 days
-# of Highs between 70-79 degrees:  19 days
-# of Highs between 60-69 degrees : 17 days
-# of Highs below 60 degrees: 8 days
-Rainfall: 11.6 inches
-# of Days of Measurable Precipitation:       29 days
-# of Days of No Measurable Precipitation:  51 days      (including the last 5 straight)

Soggy,wet,cool Spring leads to soggy,wet,muggy (and relatively cool) Summer. Persistent weather pattern lingers across 2 seasons for Northeastern US and NYC metro-area

A persistent trough in the Jet Stream over the Eastern two-thirds of the US has lingered for going on 4 straight months resulting in above normal rainfall and precipitation amounts since mid-March 2017 and now that it's lingering into the 2017 summer season,the result has been above normal rainfall totals as well as stiflingly humid,muggy conditions in the New York City tristate area in particular. Here are the Temperature and Rainfall stats for the 2017 summer season so far for the city of White Plains,NY,in suburban Westchester County,as of 12:30AM,EDT,July 20,2017 from accuweather.com










June 21:              82/64           79/61            +3/+3
June 22:              85/71           79/61            +6/+10
June 23:              82/72           79/61            +3/+11
June 24:              82/72           80/62            +2/+10
June 25:              81/63           80/62            +1/+1
June 26:              78/58           80/62             -2/-4
June 27:              79/59           80/62             -1/-3
June 28:              79/57           81/63             -2/-6
June 29:              82/68           81/63            +1/+5
June 30:              87/69           81/63            +6/+6
July 1:                 84/68          81/63             +3/+5
July 2:                 89/71          81/63             +8/+8
July 3:                 87/67          81/63             +6/+4
July 4:                 85/65          81/63             +4/+2
July 5:                 84/66          82/64             +2/+2
July 6:                 78/64          82/64              -4/0
July 7:                 79/67          82/64              -3/+3
July 8:                 84/66          82/64             +2/+2
July 9:                 81/63          82/64              -1/-1
July 10:               84/62          82/64             +2/-2
July 11:               83/71          82/64             +1/+7
July 12:               88/72          82/64             +6/+8
July 13:               91/69          83/65             +8/+4
July 14:               66/62          83/65            -17/-3
July 15:               82/64          83/65              -1/-1
July 16:               84/64          83/65             +1/-1
July 17:               82/66          83/65              -1/+1
July 18:               86/70          83/65             +3/+5
July 19:               92/72          83/65             +9/+7







-Highest Temperature: 92 degrees on July 19
-Lowest Temperature:  57 degrees on June 28
-# of High Temperatures above normal:   20 days      
-# of High Temperatures right at normal:  0 days
-# of High Temperatures below normal:     9 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees above normal: 0 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees below normal: 1 day       (July 14)
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees above normal: 0 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees below normal: 1 day       (July 14)
-# of Highs at or above 100 degrees:   0 days
-# of Highs between 90-99 degrees:    1 day       (July 13)
-# of Highs between 80-89 degrees:  20 days
-# of Highs between 70-79 degrees:    5 days
-# of Highs below 70 degrees: 1 day                   (July 14)
-Rainfall: 3.5 inches
-# of Days of Measurable Precipitation:        10 days
-# of Days of No Measurable Precipitation:   19 days        (including the last 5 straight)

2017 the wettest year on record? Persistent wet,stormy weather pattern could mean wettest year on record for the NYC area if pattern persists for rest of 2017

Thanks to persistent Jet Stream trough since mid-March 2017,the whole year of 2017 could end up being the wettest year on record for the New York City metro-area if this weather pattern not only continues through the rest of the 2017 Summer season,but into the fall/autumn and the 2017 holiday season (Labor Day through New Year's). Here's the daily rainfall tallies for the city of White Plains,NY for the whole year of 2017 so far,as of 12:30AM,EDT,July 20,2017 from accuweather.com







January 1:    None (0.00 inches)
January 2:    0.05 inches
January 3:    0.53 inches
January 4:    None
January 5:    None
January 6:    0.01 inches
January 7:    0.04 inches
January 8:    None
January 9:    None
January 10:  None
January 11:  0.42 inches
January 12:  0.11 inches
January 13:  None
January 14:  0.02 inches
January 15:  None
January 16:  None
January 17:  0.34 inches
January 18:  0.09 inches
January 19:  None
January 20:  0.04 inches
January 21:  None
January 22:  None
January 23:  0.61 inches
January 24:  0.76 inches
January 25:  None
January 26:  None
January 27:  None
January 28:  None
January 29:  None
January 30:  None
January 31:  0.16 inches
February 1:  None
February 2:  None
February 3:  None
February 4:  None
February 5:  None
February 6:  None
February 7:  0.19 inches
February 8:  0.03 inches
February 9:  0.60 inches
February 10: None
February 11: None
February 12: 0.51 inches
February 13: 0.01 inches
February 14: None
February 15: 0.08 inches
February 16: None
February 17: None
February 18: None
February 19: None
February 20: None
February 21: None
February 22: None
February 23: None
February 24: None
February 25: 0.53 inches
February 26: None
February 27: None
February 28: None
March 1:       0.35 inches
March 2:       0.01 inches
March 3:       None
March 4:       None
March 5:       None
March 6:       None
March 7:       0.04 inches
March 8:       0.04 inches
March 9:       None
March 10:     0.11 inches
March 11:     None
March 12:     None
March 13:     None
March 14:     0.98 inches
March 15:     None
March 16:     None
March 17:     None
March 18:     0.01 inches
March 19:     None
March 20:     None
March 21:     None
March 22:     None
March 23:     None
March 24:     0.01 inches
March 25:     0.03 inches
March 26:     0.07 inches
March 27:     0.42 inches
March 28:     0.67 inches
March 29:     None
March 30:     None
March 31:     1.01 inches
April 1:         0.02 inches
April 2:         None
April 3:         0.01 inches
April 4:         1.28 inches
April 5:         None
April 6:         0.99 inches
April 7:         0.01 inches
April 8:         None
April 9:         None
April 10:       None
April 11:       None
April 12:       0.06 inches
April 13:       None
April 14:       None
April 15:       None
April 16:       0.02 inches
April 17:       None
April 18:       None
April 19:       0.16 inches
April 20:       0.15 inches
April 21:       0.29 inches
April 22:       0.04 inches
April 23:       None
April 24:       None
April 25:       0.56 inches
April 26:       0.19 inches
April 27:       0.01 inches
April 28:       0.02 inches
April 29:       0.02 inches
April 30:       None
May 1:          None
May 2:          None
May 3:          None
May 4:          None
May 5:          2.21 inches
May 6:          0.13 inches
May 7:          0.03 inches
May 8:          None
May 9:          None
May 10:        None
May 11:        None
May 12:        None
May 13:        1.60 inches
May 14:        None
May 15:        None
May 16:        None
May 17:        None
May 18:        None
May 19:        0.10 inches
May 20:        None
May 21:        None
May 22:        0.48 inches
May 23:        None
May 24:        0.02 inches
May 25:        0.72 inches
May 26:        0.74 inches
May 27:        None
May 28:        None
May 29:        0.15 inches
May 30:        0.04 inches
May 31:        0.27 inches
June 1:          None
June 2:          None
June 3:          None
June 4:          0.20 inches
June 5:          0.01 inches
June 6:          0.10 inches
June 7:          None
June 8:          None
June 9:          None
June 10:        None
June 11:        None
June 12:        None
June 13:        None
June 14:        None
June 15:        None
June 16:        0.28 inches
June 17:        0.15 inches
June 18:        None
June 19:        0.50 inches
June 20:        None
June 21:        None
June 22:        None
June 23:        0.06 inches
June 24:        0.45 inches
June 25:        None
June 26:        None
June 27:        0.16 inches
June 28:        None
June 29:        None
June 30:        0.08 inches
July 1:           0.15 inches
July 2:           None
July 3:           None
July 4:           None
July 5:           None
July 6:           None
July 7:           1.13 inches
July 8:           0.03 inches
July 9:           None
July 10:         0.02 inches
July 11:         0.23 inches
July 12:         None
July 13:        0.63 inches
July 14:        0.85 inches
July 15:        None
July 16:        None
July 17:        None
July 18:        None
July 19:        None









-Rainfall: 24.26 inches
-# of Days of Measurable Precipitation:        78 days
-# of Days of No Measurable Precipitation: 122 days       (including the last 5 straight)
-Most Rainfall in one day so far this year: 2.21 inches on May 5

Where have the nine-spotted ladybugs gone? Scientists ask for your photos to document sightings

By Bianca Barr Tunno, AccuWeather staff writer
July 19,2017, 3:22:27PM,EDT
 
 They're spotty and dotty and help suppress pests. But over the past several decades, native ladybug species, such as the nine-spotted ladybug, have become rare in the United States.
Researchers want to know if these or other rare species are in your backyard -- so they're asking for your help in locating ladybugs where you live by just snapping a photo.
The Lost Ladybug Project gives participants a chance to observe their surroundings for all types of ladybugs, then provide important data to scientists that could ultimately become the next big discovery.
Anyone with a camera phone can instantly become a citizen scientist, said Prof. John Losey, Cornell University entomologist and director of the Lost Ladybug Project. Just upload the image, venture a guess as to the species and let the researchers do the rest.
“Even though citizen scientists may not be able to identify a species correctly, they can still make their attempt at identification,” Losey said. “Every data point is certified by our experts and then only the ones where we can identify the species go into the database.”
ladybugs on leaf
(BruceBlock/iStock/Getty Images Plus)

Losey has documented nearly 40,000 ladybugs. He said the database shows invasive or introduced foreign species continue to increase their dominance across North America but small populations of native lady beetles, though isolated, are fairly stable.
“Every image... increases our understanding of what’s happening to the whole ladybug complex and that’s now being used to set conservation plans and get some things listed [as species of greatest conservation need].”
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Working with crowd-sourcing volunteers and their varying lady beetle locations, Losey and his team say they evaluate a greater variety of data than conventional science can offer. He said conventional science can have depth because of the big sample sizes available in agricultural settings around academic institutions.
But with citizen science, he said you get incredible breadth because spotters will send only one or two photos of ladybugs -- small sample sizes -- but they are from all 50 states, Canada and Mexico, and they tend to not be in agricultural settings.
“Using this wider net cast by our citizen scientists, over the last 10 to 15 years, we’ve identified substantially more of the rare native species than has been identified through conventional science,” Losey said.
Lost Ladybug Project
This AP file photo shows Jaya Walsh and her son Gaelen looking for ladybugs while volunteering in the Lost Ladybug Project near Ithaca, N.Y. (AP Photo/Kevin Rivoli)

The difficulty in finding the nine-spotted ladybug (Coccinella novemnotata) is what inspired the Lost Ladybug Project. It used to be one of the most common ladybugs across North America. Today, the species is extremely rare but Losey says he’s cataloged a few hundred of what he calls the “flagship species” of the project in New York, Oregon and Virginia among others.
“We’ve gone from a really diverse complex of native species to a much less diverse complex, dominated by a few foreign cosmopolitan species,” Losey said. “We are seeing that same trend worldwide.”
And he said that affects how well the lady beetles suppress pest populations. He suggests the more variety, the better.
“Without ladybugs and other predators out doing their jobs, we could never grow the crops that we need to survive.”

Flash floods, wildfires to riddle western US through this weekend


By Alex Sosnowski, AccuWeather senior meteorologist
July 19,2017, 9:47:23PM,EDT
The risk of isolated flash flooding and wildfire ignition and spread will continue across parts of the western United States through this weekend.
A northward surge of high humidity associated with the North American monsoon will produce sporadic rainfall and may ease the threat of wildfires in some areas and assist firefighting efforts in others.
However, this same batch of moisture can produce thunderstorms with torrential rain in a small area and no rain with chaotic wind gusts in others.
Static Four Corners Storms

The terrain and arid nature in much of the region sets the stage for both flash floods and the rapid spread of wildfires.
Nine people were killed and one is still missing following flash flooding at a popular swimming spot in central Arizona this past weekend, according to the Associated Press. A wall of water from a distant thunderstorm flowed rapidly down a placid stream and overwhelmed the bathers near the town of Payson.
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As the pattern continues through this weekend and beyond, flash flooding can strike not only rural areas and recent wildfire scars in the region. Portions of the major metro areas of Las Vegas, Phoenix and Salt Lake City could be affected.
Motorists should remain on the lookout for sudden flooding during downpours as well as a sudden drop in visibility from dust in areas where little or no rain falls.
Campers and hikers should keep abreast of their surroundings by scanning for distant thunderstorms and monitoring weather bulletins as they are issued.
The intense summer sun will continue to beat down on the landscape and dry out vegetation over much of the region.
Static Fire Weather West

While fluctuations in fire weather will occur on a daily basis, the risk of wildfire ignition and spread will remain.
Thunderstorms, by their namesake, generate lightning. When lightning strikes dry brush, a fire can erupt. While as many as 90 percent of wildland fires in the U.S are caused by humans, much of the remaining causes are from lightning strikes, according to the National Park Service.
"The greatest risk of lightning-induced wildfires will be on the leading edge of the moisture from the monsoon," according to AccuWeather Meteorologist Evan Duffey.
In this area, the storms generally lack a great deal of moisture and tend to yield very limited rainfall, but produce a significant amount of lightning strikes.
The cycle of spring growth, followed by summer heat and wildfires, are familiar to those who have spent years in the West.
"Following the ample rain and mountain snow from this winter, there is more brush available to act as a potential source of fuel for the fires in the lower and intermediate elevations," Duffey said.
Static AP Image Mariposa, California Fire July 18, 2017

"At least in high country, the fuels will remain wet much longer and more resistant to fire, thanks to lower temperatures and the snow cover that lingered well into the spring," Duffey said.
As of Wednesday, July 19, 2017, there were dozens of active wildfires in the western U.S., including at least 17 in Arizona, 18 in Nevada, 11 in Montana, 10 in New Mexico, nine in California, nine in Colorado, six in Idaho, four in Washington, two in Utah, one in Oregon and one in Wyoming, according to the Incident Information System.
 

2017 Open Championship: Rain, wind to challenge players on Thursday and Friday


By Eric Leister, AccuWeather meteorologist
July 19,2017, 9:56:13PM,EDT
 
 
The weather will once again create challenging conditions for players at the Open Championship in England.
Dry weather is expected for the start of the 2017 Open Championship on Thursday at Royal Birkdale in Southport.
Morning cloud will yield to increasing sunshine during the midday and afternoon hours.
UK 7/19
Temperatures will be seasonably cool with highs only expected to reach 18 C (64 F). Gusty winds will be the biggest determent to play at west winds off the water will blow at 10-20 mph (15-30 km/h) with higher gusts.
The weather will worsen on Friday as periods of rain and strong winds create difficult playing conditions.
The strongest winds are expected into the early afternoon when sustained winds of 15-25 mph (24-40 km/h) are expected with gusts as high as 40 mph (65 km/h).
British Open 7/19
Henrik Stenson of Sweden kisses the trophy after winning the British Open Golf Championships at the Royal Troon Golf Club in Troon, Scotland, Sunday, July 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Showers are expected throughout the morning before longer spells of rain arrive from midday on.
The rain could fall hard enough to cause some brief delays to play if the greens and fairways become waterlogged.
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It will also feel quite chilly with temperatures around 15-16 C (59-61 F) throughout the day.
The weather will improve some on Saturday as the rain becomes showery and winds lessen compared to Friday.
Showers and occasional gusts to 20 mph (32 km/h) will still create less-than-ideal playing conditions.
Additional improvement is expected for the final round on Sunday as sunshine returns along with largely dry weather.
Wind gusts to 20 mph (32 km/h) are again possible, especially during the afternoon hours.

Volatile storms will unleash flooding risk along the rim of heat in the northeastern US


By Alex Sosnowski, AccuWeather senior meteorologist
July 19,2017, 2:49:28PM,EDT
 
 Rounds of thunderstorms with torrential rain and gusty winds will ride the rim of heat and roll across portions of the northeastern United States into this weekend.
The weather pattern will raise the risk of flooding and isolated damaging winds. At the very least, travel disruptions and sporadic power outages are likely.
Temperatures will climb well into the 90s F at times from the Ohio Valley to part of the mid-Atlantic for the balance of the week. Meanwhile, temperatures will peak in the middle 70s to the middle 80s across northern New York state and central and northern New England.
Static Stormy Pattern Thursday to Sunday Northeast

"A weather setup such as this has produced storms with flooding in the past," according to AccuWeather Chief Meteorologist Elliot Abrams.
A batch or train of thunderstorms was responsible for the Johnstown, Pennsylvania, flood of July 19-20, 1977. Close to a foot of rain fell in 24 hours over the mountains north of the city. A series of dams failed with sent a wall of water into the city. Dozens were killed and damage topped $100 million.
A similar setup mostly likely was the cause of the Smethport, Pennsylvania, record rainfall and flood of July 17, 1942. In just 12 hours, 34.30 inches of rain fell. The torrential rain caused catastrophic mudslides and flooding that took the lives of more than a dozen people.
While an outcome similar to that of either flood is unlikely, some communities may face flooding on a smaller scale. Those spending time at campgrounds near streams and rivers should exercise caution and keep up to date on weather bulletins as they are issued.
This could evolve into a life-threatening event.
"Exactly where the temperature contrast zone sets up each day will determine the main path of the storms and areas at greatest risk for damage and disruptions from flooding and strong winds," according to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Dave Dombek.
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Multiple rounds of thunderstorms will roll southeastward from the northern Plains and the Great Lakes region, to the central Appalachians and then the mid-Atlantic coast on a daily basis beginning on Thursday.
Each batch of storms can be accompanied by multiple downpours and unleash torrential rainfall.
One group of storms is likely from later Thursday into early Friday.
A second batch of storms is likely from Friday night to Saturday. This batch has the greatest potential to bring significant flooding.
Static Flash Flood Risk Friday Saturday NE

A third series is likely from later Saturday to Sunday. This batch is most likely to affect a broad area with perhaps less intense rainfall but isolated incidents of flash flooding.
Some communities in the core of one or more of the storms may receive upwards of 4 inches of rain.
Meanwhile, areas to the south that remain in the core of the heat may receive little or no rainfall during the entire time into the first part of weekend.
The risk of flooding and damaging winds will be lower, but not non-existent in New England. Some rain and embedded thunderstorms are likely to reach the region. The area will be farther removed from the heat to the southwest, so the atmosphere may not be as volatile.
Ahead of the main severe weather and flooding threat, very spotty storms can erupt in the afternoon and evening hours in coastal areas from southern New England through the mid-Atlantic on Wednesday.

Severe storms to heighten flood risk across Germany into Thursday


By Eric Leister, AccuWeather meteorologist
July 19,2017, 12:48:07PM,EDT
 
 
A surge of heat and humidity across Germany will set the stage for violent thunderstorms on Thursday.
Temperatures soared to the highest levels in several weeks throughout Germany on Wednesday with some locations surpassing 32 C (90 F).
A cold front moving through the country on Thursday will interact with the heat and humidity causing showers and thunderstorms to erupt.
Germany 7/19
While all locations can have a shower or thunderstorm, the greatest risk for severe storms will be across the eastern two-thirds of the country.
“Flash flooding will be the greatest threat from these storms,” said AccuWeather Meteorologist Tyler Roys.
“I am particularly worried about areas from near Hamburg to Berlin,” added Roys.
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Rainfall amounts in excess of 25 mm (1 inch) per hour are expected, resulting in dangerous flash flooding and widespread travel delays.
Other areas that could see flash flooding and locally damaging winds include Frankfurt, Stuttgart and Munich.

Cooler and less humid air will settle over much of the country on Friday; however, there will be a continued threat for heavy rainfall across southern Germany.
Areas from Stuttgart to Munich will have to contend with the threat for flash flooding and travel delays for a second day.
Additional showers and thunderstorms will pop up across the country this weekend but the threat for flooding will be minimal.

Destructive Detwiler Fire forces evacuations near Yosemite National Park

By Kevin Byrne, AccuWeather staff writer
July 19,2017, 2:02:51PM,EDT
 
 The Detwiler Fire, which has burned more than 45,000 acres since Sunday, has triggered evacuations and road closures throughout Mariposa County in central California.
The blaze, which is burning near Yosemite National Park, has already destroyed eight structures and damaged another. At least 1,500 structures remain threatened, according to Cal Fire officials.
Detwiler wildfire
This photo shows the Detwiler Fire from near Horseshoe Bend on Highway 132 on Monday. (Facebook/Toney Gorham via Storyful)

The entire town of Mariposa was ordered to evacuate, according to officials. The town is home to about 2,000 residents.
Highway 140 was closed in the Mariposa area and traffic along Highway 149, and southbound and northbound routes of Highway 49 will be impacted by road closures.
On Tuesday, California Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency for Mariposa County due to the effects of the fire, which is 7 percent contained as of Wednesday morning.
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Fire officials said power lines located south of the fire, which supply power to the national park, were in danger of being burned. Yosemite remains open to visitors.
law enforcement wildfire
Law enforcement officials assisted with evacuation notices and security in response to the Detwiler Fire in Mariposa County, California. (Photo/Tuolumne County Sheriff's Office)

Firefighters were experiencing "extreme and aggressive fire behavior," Cal Fire said. The fire's flames were also encroaching on "culturally and historically sensitive areas."
More than 2,200 fire personnel are on hand to combat the blaze, along with over 200 fire engines, nine air tankers and 11 helicopters.

Tour de France: Stormy conditions to be unleashed on final stages this week


By Eric Leister, AccuWeather meteorologist
July 19,2017, 9:09:49AM,EDT
 
 
Following a week with very few weather impacts, rain and thunderstorms could play a major factor in the final stages of the Tour de France this week.
Stages 18 and 19 will take place in southeastern France with each stage taking the cyclists on ride through the French Alps.
Heat will not be a factor on Thursday with temperatures ranging from 15 C (59 F) near the passes to 23 C (73 F) in the valleys.
TDF 7/19

Widespread rain and thunderstorms will threaten the stage from start to finish.
Blinding downpours and frequent lighting will be the biggest threats to both riders and spectators.
The rainfall will create slick conditions on already difficult stages requiring even more skill and strategy.
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As the cyclists venture back into the lower elevations of southern France during Stage 19 on Friday, they will encounter steamy conditions with increased humidity and temperatures over 32 C (90 F).
This heat and humidity will remain quite high for Saturday’s time trail in Marseille with temperatures near 32 C (90 F); however, the threat for rainfall will come to an end as sunshine returns.
Cooler conditions are expected for the final stage on Sunday in Paris with a high temperature of 24 C (75 F) amid partial sunshine and the chance for a shower or thunderstorm in the afternoon.