Friday, July 21, 2017

New York City metro-area forecast for July 21-October 18,2017 from accuweather.com

Here's the 90-day weather forecast for the New York City metro-area for the period of the last 11 days of July,all of August,all of September and the first 18 days of October (July 21-October 18),2017 from accuweather.com










Tonight,July 21-22: Remaining warm and humid with patchy clouds and a low temperature dropping to 70-75 degrees,overnight.As of 2AM,EDT,July 22,it's 78 degrees and cloudy,with 75% humidity making it feel like it's 84 degrees,in White Plains,NY,and it's 84 degrees and cloudy,with 60% humidity,making it feel like it's 88 degrees,in New York City.

Tomorrow,July 22: Remaining hot and humid with intervals of clouds and sunshine and a high temperature of 90-95 degrees,the very light,steamy,westerly winds and high humidity levels making it feel even hotter,like it's around 100 degrees,at times.

Tomorrow night,July 22-23: Turning cloudy and rainy,but remaining warm and humid with occasional rain and a low temperature dropping to the upper 60's to lower 70's,overnight.

Sunday,July 23: Turning much cooler than recent days,but remaining rainy,stormy,warm and humid with variable cloudiness and a chance for an afternoon rain shower and a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Remaining cloudy,rainy,stormy,warm and humid with a chance for a couple of showers and a thunderstorm,which may be strong to severe,and a low temperature dropping to the upper 60's to lower 70's,once again,overnight.

Monday,July 24: Remaining cloudy and stormy,but turning very warm and sticky,once again,with a chance for an afternoon thunderstorm possible and a high temperature in the middle 80's,the very light,sultry,westerly winds and high humidity levels making it feel much warmer,like it's in the middle 90's,at times.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining warm and humid with a chance for an evening thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping to around 70 degrees,overnight.

Tuesday,July 25: Turning partly sunny and cooler with a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Becoming partly cloudy and cooler than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 60's,overnight.

Wednesday,July 26: Remaining partly sunny and seasonably warm for very late July and mid-summer,with a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's,once again.Turning cloudy and rainy, once again,with increasing cloudiness and a chance for some late-night rain and a thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping to the upper 60's to lower 70's,overnight.

Thursday,July 27: Remaining cloudy,rainy,and seasonably warm for the end of July,with a chance for a couple of rain showers and a high temperature,for the third straight day,in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Remaining cloudy and rainy with a chance for a brief evening rain shower or two followed by clearing and a low temperature dropping to the upper 60's to lower 70's,once again,overnight.

Friday,July 28: Remaining cloudy and rainy,but turning warmer than recent days,with considerable cloudiness and a chance for an afternoon shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's.Remaining cloudy,rainy,seasonably warm and humid for the end of July,with periods of rain and a chance for a thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Saturday,July 29: Remaining cloudy,very warm and humid with a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's,once again.Remaining cloudy and rainy,with plenty of clouds and a chance for a couple of evening rain showers followed by a steadier,heavier rain leading to flooding and a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Sunday,July 30: Remaining rather cloudy,rainy,stormy,very warm and humid with a shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature,for the third straight day,in the middle and upper 80's.Becoming partly cloudy and cooler than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 60's,overnight.

Monday,July 31: July of 2017;one of the muggiest,steamiest,rainiest,stormiest Julys on record,ends remaining cloudy and rainy,but turning cooler than recent days,with rain at times and a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Remaining cloudy and stormy through the evening with a chance for a spotty evening thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees, overnight.

Tuesday,August 1: August of 2017 begins turning partly sunny,seasonably warm and humid with a chance for a couple of rain showers for the sixth straight day,and a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's,once again,the very light,sticky,northwesterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel even warmer,like it's 85-90 degrees,at times.Becoming clear to partly cloudy FOR A CHANGE, with a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees,once again,overnight.

Wednesday,August 2: Finally turning mostly sunny for the first time in nearly 2 WEEKS,with a high temperature of 80-85 degrees.Remaining clear to partly cloudy and seasonably warm for mid-summer and the beginning of August,with a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 60's,overnight.

Thursday,August 3: Becoming partly sunny,but remaining seasonably warm and dry FOR A CHANGE,with a high temperature of 80-85 degrees,once again.Becoming partly cloudy and cooler than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to around 60 degrees,overnight.

Friday,August 4: Becoming cloudy,but remaining seasonably warm and dry with a high temperature in the lower and middle 80's.Becoming mostly cloudy and warmer with a chance for a rain shower and a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Saturday,August 5: Becoming mostly sunny,quite warm and steamy with a chance for an afternoon rain shower and a high temperature of 85-90 degrees,the very light,nearly calm,stationary, southeasterly winds and very high humidity levels making it feel brutally to dangerously hot,like it's in the middle 100's,at times.Becoming mainly clear,but remaining seasonably warm and humid for mid-summer,with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 60's,overnight.

Sunday,August 6: Remaining mostly sunny and very warm,but turning less humid with a high temperature in the middle 80's.Remaining mainly clear and warm with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 60's,once again,overnight.

Monday,August 7: Remaining very warm for early August and mid-summer,with increasing cloudiness and a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's.Becoming mostly cloudy,but remaining seasonably warm and dry with a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Tuesday,August 8: Turning cloudy,rainy,quite warm and humid with periods of rain and a high temperature of 85-90 degrees.Becoming mainly clear,warm and humid with a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Wednesday,August 9: Becoming cloudy,rainy and stormy,once again,with plenty of clouds and a chance for a couple of afternoon showers and a thunderstorm possible and a high temperature in the middle 80's.Remaining mostly cloudy,rainy,stormy,warm and humid with a scattered shower or thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,once again,overnight.

Thursday,August 10: Remaining quite warm for mid-to-late summer,but turning less humid with partial sunshine and a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's.Becoming mainly clear with a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Friday,August 11: Turning cooler than recent days,with a mix of sun and some clouds and a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Becoming clear and cooler than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees,overnight.

Saturday,August 12: Remaining seasonably warm for mid-to-late summer,with a mix of sunshine and some clouds and a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's,once again.Remaining clear to partly cloudy and seasonably warm for early-to-mid August,with a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees,once again,overnight.

Sunday,August 13: Becoming mostly sunny,but remaining seasonably warm for early-to-mid August,with a high temperature,for the third straight day,in the upper 70's to lower 80's. Becoming mainly clear,but remaining seasonably warm for mid-to-late summer,with a low temperature dropping,for the third straight night,down to 60-65 degrees,overnight.

Monday,August 14: Becoming partly sunny and more humid than recent days,but remaining seasonably warm for mid-August with a high temperature,for the fourth straight day,in the upper 70's to lower 80's,the very light,almost nonexistent,westerly winds and high humidity levels making it feel even warmer,like it's 85-90 degrees,at times.Becoming mainly clear and comfortably mild to warm for mid-to-late summer,with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Tuesday,August 15: Remaining warm for mid-August and late summer,with periods of clouds and sun and a high temperature of 80-85 degrees.Not as cool as recent nights,with clearing and a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 60's,overnight.

Wednesday,August 16: Turning partly sunny and warmer than recent days,with a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's.Becoming partly cloudy and warmer than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Thursday,August 17: Becoming sunny and unseasonably hot for mid-August and late summer,with a near record high temperature of 85-90 degrees.Remaining mainly clear and warm with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 60's,overnight.

Friday,August 18: Becoming mostly cloudy and not as warm with a high temperature in the middle 80's.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining warm for mid-to-late August,with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 60's,once again,overnight.

Saturday,August 19: Remaining very warm for mid-to-late August,with partial sunshine and a high temperature in the lower and middle 80's.Becoming clear and warm with a low temperature dropping to 65-70 degrees,overnight.

Sunday,August 20: Turning unseasonably quite warm and sticky,with partial sunshine and a chance for a scattered shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's,the light,sultry,southwesterly winds and high humidity levels making it feel even warmer,like it's 90-95 degrees,at times.Becoming mostly cloudy,rainy,stormy and cooler than recent nights,with a chance for a couple of showers and a thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Monday,August 21: Remaining very warm for late August and late summer,with intervals of clouds and sunshine and a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's,once again.Remaining seasonably warm for late summer,with patchy clouds and a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,once again,overnight.

Tuesday,August 22: Not as warm nor as humid as recent days,with brilliant sunshine and a high temperature of 80-85 degrees.Becoming clear and seasonably warm for late summer,with a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees,overnight.

Wednesday,August 23: Remaining sunny and very warm for very late August,with a high temperature of 80-85 degrees,once again.Remaining clear and seasonably warm for late summer,with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Thursday,August 24: Remaining sunny and very warm for very late August,with a high temperature,for the third straight day,of 80-85 degrees.Remaining clear,but turning warmer than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Friday,August 25: Remaining mostly sunny,but turning warmer than recent days,with a high temperature in the middle and upper 80's.Remaining mainly clear,but not as warm,with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Saturday,August 26: Remaining mostly sunny and unseasonably very warm for very late August and late summer,with a high temperature in the middle 80's.Remaining clear,but not as cool,with a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Sunday,August 27: Becoming partly sunny,rainy and stormy,with a scattered shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature in the lower and middle 80's.Remaining mostly cloudy,rainy,stormy, seasonably warm and humid for the end of August,with spotty thunderstorms possible and a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees,overnight.

Monday,August 28: Turning unseasonably hot for the end of August,with partial sunshine and a high temperature of around 90 degrees.Remaining partly cloudy,but not as warm as recent nights,with a low temperature plunging down to around 60 degrees,overnight.

Tuesday,August 29: Turning much cooler than recent days,with partial sunshine and a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Remaining partly cloudy and seasonably warm for very late summer and the end of August,with a low temperature dropping to around 60 degrees,once again,overnight.

Wednesday,August 30: Becoming mostly sunny,but remaining seasonably warm for the end of August,with a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's,once again.Becoming clear and a bit warmer than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees,overnight.

Thursday,August 31: August of 2017 ends remaining seasonably warm for very late summer,with abundant sunshine and a high temperature,for the third straight day,in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Remaining clear to partly cloudy,but turning warmer than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 60's,overnight.

Friday,September 1: September of 2017 begins turning warmer than recent days,with a mix of sun and some clouds and a high temperature in the middle 80's.Remaining partly cloudy and warm with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 60's,once again,overnight.

Saturday,September 2: Remaining unseasonably quite warm and humid for the beginning of September with intervals of clouds and sunshine and a high temperature of 85-90 degrees.Becoming rather cloudy and warm with a low temperature dropping to the middle 60's,overnight.

Sunday,September 3: Not as warm with low clouds and fog followed by some sun and a high temperature of 80-85 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy and cooler than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to around 60 degrees,overnight.

Monday,September 4: Labor Day 2017;the unofficial end of the 2017 summer season,will be turning mostly sunny,but remaining very warm for very early September,with a high temperature of 80-85 degrees,once again.Remaining clear and seasonably warm for the end of summer,with a low temperature dropping to around 60 degrees,once again,overnight.

Tuesday,September 5: Remaining sunny and very warm for very early September and the end of summer,with a high temperature in the lower and middle 80's.Remaining clear and warm with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Wednesday,September 6: Remaining sunny and very warm for the end of summer,with a high temperature of 80-85 degrees.Remaining mainly clear and warm for early September,with a low temperature dropping to around 60 degrees,overnight.

Thursday,September 7: Becoming partly sunny,but remaining unseasonably warm for the end of summer,with a high temperature of 80-85 degrees,once again.Becoming mainly clear and a bit warmer than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees,overnight.

Friday,September 8: Becoming mostly sunny,but remaining unseasonably very warm for early September,with a high temperature,for the third straight day,of 80-85 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy,but remaining warm for the end of summer,with a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees,once again,overnight.

Saturday,September 9: Remaining very warm for early September,with a blend of sun and some clouds and a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Remaining partly cloudy and warm with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Sunday,September 10: Not as warm as recent days,with intervals of clouds and sunshine and a chance for a scattered shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature of 75-80 degrees.Remaining partly cloudy and warm for the end of summer,with a low temperature dropping to 60-65 degrees, overnight.

Monday,September 11: The 16-year anniversary of the 9/11-terrorist attacked on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon and the 5-year anniversary of the 9/11-terrorist attacks in Benghazi,will be turning unseasonably warm,once again,with a mix of sun and some clouds and a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Remaining rather warm for the end of summer,with patchy clouds and a low temperature in the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Tuesday,September 12: Turning rather cloudy,rainy and cooler than recent days,with a touch of rain and a high temperature in the middle and upper 70's.Remaining cloudy,rainy,and seasonably warm with considerable cloudiness and a touch of rain and a low temperature dropping to 55-60 degrees,overnight.

Wednesday,September 13: Remaining mostly cloudy and seasonably warm for early-to-mid September and the end of summer,with a high temperature of 75-80 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,overnight.

Thursday,September 14: Remaining partly sunny and unseasonably warm for mid-September,with a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower 80's.Remaining partly cloudy and warm with a low temperature dropping to the upper 50's to lower 60's,once again,overnight.

Friday,September 15: Becoming mostly sunny,but remaining unseasonably warm for mid-September and the end of summer,with a high temperature of around 80 degrees.Remaining mainly clear and warm with a low temperature dropping to around 60 degrees,overnight.

Saturday,September 16: Remaining mostly sunny and unseasonably warm for mid-September,with a high temperature in the upper 70's to lower and middle 80's.Remaining clear and unseasonably warm with a low temperature dropping to around 60 degrees,once again,overnight.

Sunday,September 17: Becoming partly sunny,but remaining unseasonably warm for the end of summer,with a high temperature of around 80 degrees.Becoming partly cloudy and cooler than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to the middle 50's,overnight.

Monday,September 18: Remaining rather warm for mid-to-late September with partial sunshine and a high temperature of 75-80 degrees.Becoming clear and cool,with a low temperature dropping to 50-55 degrees,overnight.

Tuesday,September 19: Becoming mostly sunny and cooler than recent days,as it turns seasonably warm for mid-to-late September and the end of summer,with a high temperature of 70-75 degrees.Remaining mainly clear,but turning unseasonably cool for mid-to-late September with a low temperature dropping to around 50 degrees,the blustery,biting,northwesterly winds,which could gust up to 25-mph,at times,making it feel even colder,like it's only in the upper 30's to lower 40's,at times,overnight.

Wednesday,September 20: Remaining mostly sunny and seasonably warm for late September,with a high temperature in the upper 60's to lower 70's.Remaining clear,crisp and cool for late September, with a low temperature dropping to around 50 degrees,once again,overnight.

Thursday,September 21: The last (full), day of the 2017 summer season;one of the hottest,rainiest, stormiest,muggiest,steamiest summers on record,will be remaining seasonably warm for late September,with a high temperature in the upper 60's to lower 70's,once again.Remaining clear and rather cool for late September,with a low temperature dropping to the upper 40's to lower 50's, overnight.

Friday,September 22: The first day of the 2017 autumn season (the 2017 Autumnal Equinox),will be remaining seasonably warm for late September,with brilliant sunshine and a high temperature of 70-75 degrees.Remaining seasonably cool to mild for very late September,with thickening cloudiness and a low temperature dropping to the upper 40's to lower 50's,once again,the blustery,biting, southwesterly winds,which could gust past 30-mph,at times,making it feel even colder,like it's only in the upper 30's to lower 40's,at times,overnight.

Saturday,September 23: Remaining seasonably warm for very late September,with periods of clouds and sun and a high temperature in the upper 60's to lower 70's.Turning partly cloudy and a bit milder than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to 50-55 degrees,overnight.

Sunday,September 24: Becoming mostly sunny,but remaining seasonably warm with a high temperature in the upper 60's to lower 70's,once again.Becoming mainly clear,but remaining seasonably mild for the beginning of autumn,with a low temperature dropping to the upper 40's to lower 50's,overnight.

Monday,September 25: Remaining seasonably warm for very late September,with increasing cloudiness and a high temperature,for the third straight day,in the upper 60's to lower 70's.Remaining seasonably mild for the beginning of autumn,with clearing and a low temperature dropping to around 50 degrees,overnight.

Tuesday,September 26: Becoming partly sunny,but remaining seasonably warm with a high temperature of around 70 degrees.Becoming mainly clear,but remaining seasonably mild with a low temperature dropping to 50-55 degrees,overnight.

Wednesday,September 27: Remaining seasonably warm for the end of September and the beginning of autumn,with a mix of clouds and sunshine and a high temperature of around 70 degrees.Becoming mostly cloudy,but remaining seasonably mild for the beginning of autumn,with a low temperature dropping to around 50 degrees,the blustery,westerly winds,which could gust past 20-mph,at times, making it feel even colder,like it's only in the upper 30's to lower 40's,at times,overnight.

Thursday,September 28: Remaining seasonably warm for the end of September,with periods of clouds and sun and a high temperature in the upper 60's to lower 70's.Remaining partly cloudy and seasonably mild with a low temperature dropping to the upper 40's to lower 50's,overnight.

Friday,September 29: Becoming mostly sunny,but remaining seasonably warm for the end of September,with a high temperature in the upper 60's to lower 70's,once again.Becoming mainly clear and windy late,with a low temperature dropping to around 50 degrees,the blustery,biting, southwesterly winds,which could gust up to 35-mph,at times,making it feel even colder,like it's only around 40 degrees,at times,overnight.

Saturday,September 30: September of 2017 ends turning rainy and warmer than recent days,with partial sunshine and a chance for a stray rain shower and a high temperature in the middle 70's.Becoming partly cloudy and cooler than recent nights,with a low temperature dropping to the middle and upper 40's,overnight.

Sunday,October 1: October of 2017 begins not as warm with abundant sunshine and a high temperature of 65-70 degrees.Not as chilly,with clear skies and a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 50's,overnight.

Monday,October 2: Turning cloudy,rainy and warm with considerable cloudiness and a bit of rain possible and a high temperature of around 70 degrees.Remaining rather cloudy and warm for early autumn and the beginning of October,with a chance for a rain shower and a low temperature dropping to the middle 50's,overnight.

Tuesday,October 3: Turning unseasonably warm for the beginning of October,with partly sunny skies and a high temperature in the middle 70's.Becoming mainly clear,but remaining rather mild for early autumn,with a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 50's,overnight.

Wednesday,October 4: Remaining unseasonably warm for very early October and early autumn,with mostly sunny skies and a high temperature in the middle and upper 70's.Remaining clear and unseasonably mild for early autumn,with a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 50's,once again,overnight.

Thursday,October 5: Becoming mostly sunny,but remaining unseasonably warm for early October with a high temperature in the middle 70's.Remaining mainly clear and unseasonably mild with a low temperature dropping to 50-55 degrees,overnight.

Friday,October 6: Remaining unseasonably warm for early October,with a mix of sun and some clouds and a chance for a shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature of 70-75 degrees.Remaining partly cloudy,rainy and mild,with a spotty rain shower possible and a low temperature dropping to 50-55 degrees,once again,overnight.

Saturday,October 7: Remaining cloudy,rainy,stormy and unseasonably warm for early October,with a mix of clouds and sunshine and a chance for a scattered shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature in the lower and middle 70's.Remaining partly cloudy and unseasonably mild with a low temperature dropping,for the third straight night,down to 50-55 degrees,overnight.

Sunday,October 8: Remaining unseasonably warm for early October and early autumn,with periods of clouds and sun and a chance for a rain shower and a high temperature of 70-75 degrees.Remaining partly cloudy,rainy and stormy,but turning cooler than recent nights,with a scattered shower or thunderstorm possible and a low temperature dropping to 45-50 degrees,the blustery,biting, southeasterly winds,which could gust past 20-mph,at times,making it feel even colder,like it's only 35-40 degrees,at times,overnight.

Monday,October 9: Columbus Day 2017 will be remaining rather warm for early October and early autumn,with a blend of clouds and sun and a chance for a shower or thunderstorm possible and a high temperature in the upper 60's to lower 70's.Turning rather chilly for early October,with partly cloudy skies and a chance for a rain shower and a low temperature dropping to the lower and middle 40's,the blustery,biting, gusty,southerly winds,which could gust up to 40-mph,at times,making it feel much colder,making it feel very cold for early October,like it's only 30-35 degrees above zero,at times,overnight.

Tuesday,October 10: Remaining mostly cloudy,rainy,stormy and unseasonably warm for early October,with a chance for a couple of showers and a thunderstorm possible and a high temperature in the upper 60's to lower 70's,once again.Remaining unseasonably chilly for early October,with partly cloudy skies and a low temperature plunging down to 40-45 degrees,the blustery,biting,northwesterly winds,which could gust past 30-mph,at times,making it feel even colder,like it's only 30-35 degrees above zero,at times,once again,overnight.

Wednesday,October 11: Becoming mostly sunny and much cooler than recent days,with a high temperature of 60-65 degrees.Not as chilly as recent nights,with clear skies and a low temperature dropping to 45-50 degrees,overnight.

Thursday,October 12: Remaining mostly sunny and seasonably mild for early October and early autumn,with a high temperature in the middle 60's.Remaining clear to partly cloudy and seasonably cool for early autumn and early October,with a low temperature dropping to 45-50 degrees,once again,overnight.

Friday,October 13: Turning milder than recent days,with periods of clouds and sun and a high temperature of 65-70 degrees.Remaining partly cloudy and seasonably mild for early-to-mid October,with a low temperature dropping,for the third straight night,down to 45-50 degrees, overnight.

Saturday,October 14: Not as warm with sun through high clouds and a high temperature of 60-65 degrees.Remaining seasonably mild for mid-October and early autumn,with increasing cloudiness and a low temperature dropping,for the fourth straight night,down to 45-50 degrees,overnight.

Sunday,October 15: Turning cloudy,rainy,raw,and seasonably mild for mid-October,with a chance for a little rain and a high temperature in the upper 50's to lower 60's.Remaining mostly cloudy,rainy,raw and seasonably mild for mid-October,with a chance for a little rain possible and a low temperature dropping,for the fifth straight night,down to 45-50 degrees,the blustery,biting,northeasterly winds,which could gust up to 25-mph,at times,making it feel even colder,like it's only around 40 degrees,at times,overnight.

Monday,October 16: Turning partly sunny and warmer than recent days,with a high temperature of around 70 degrees.Remaining partly cloudy and unseasonably mild for mid-October,with a low temperature dropping to around 50 degrees,overnight.

Tuesday,October 17: Remaining unseasonably mild for mid-October and early autumn,with a mix of clouds and sunshine and a high temperature of 65-70 degrees.Remaining partly cloudy and mild with a low temperature dropping to the upper 40's to lower 50's,overnight.

Wednesday,October 18: Remaining unseasonably mild to warm for mid-to-late October,with morning clouds giving way to sun and a high temperature in the upper 60's to lower 70's.Becoming partly cloudy and not as mild,with a low temperature dropping to 45-50 degrees,the blustery,biting, southwesterly winds,which could gust past 25-mph,at times,making it feel even colder,like it's only in the upper 30's to lower 40's,at times,overnight.

Where Did the ‘Dog Days’ of Summer Come From?

Brian Donegan
Published: July 20,2017

The "dog days" of summer are in full swing as portions of the nation bake in 90- and 100-degree heat during what is climatologically the hottest time of the year.
We use this saying every year around this time, and its origins date back thousands of years.
The phrase dog days goes all the way back to the ancient Egyptians, who reigned from around 3100 B.C. to 332 B.C. in northeast Africa.
(MORE: July Is the Warmest Time of the Year for Much of the U.S.)
The ancient Egyptians believed exceptionally hot weather was directly related to the appearance of the dog star Sirius in the constellation Canis Major.
Sirius is visible in Egypt's sky from about July 3 to August 11. Therefore, the dog days are technically over by mid-August despite the modern interpretation which typically portrays endless heat that may define the month of August.
(MORE: Why Seasons Aren't the Same to Meteorologists as the Rest of Us)
Sirius, in the constellation Canis Major, is the closest star visible with the naked eye from the Northern Hemisphere's mid-latitudes.
(NASA)
Ancient Egyptians thought the energy from Sirius combined with the sun's energy to produce heat waves.
Sirius is approximately 23 times brighter than the sun, but the dog star is 546,000 times farther from the Earth. As a result, the intensity of the radiation that reaches the Earth from Sirius is minuscule in comparison to the energy received from the sun.
Consequently, the dog star has nothing to do with the hot temperatures typical of July and August other than an ancient saying that we continue to use each summer to describe the uncomfortable conditions.
Brian Donegan is a digital meteorologist at weather.com. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter.
MORE: 50 Places to See in Summer

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

Yes, There Was a Derecho Wednesday in the Midwest; Here's What That Means

Jon Erdman
Published: July 20,2017


A cluster of severe thunderstorms Wednesday and Wednesday night in the northern Plains and upper Midwest was a low-end derecho, with reports of wind damage and high winds spanning parts of six states.
(MORE: Tornado Central)
Some 140 reports of strong thunderstorm wind gusts or wind damage were received by local National Weather Service offices from northern South Dakota to northwest Indiana Wednesday.
Preliminary severe weather reports on July 19, 2017. The yellow arrow roughly highlights the path of the derecho from South Dakota to northwest Indiana.
(NOAA/NWS/SPC)
This almost-continuous swath roughly 750 miles long lasted more than 14 hours from the first severe wind report in Corson County, South Dakota, around 8:30 a.m. CDT to the final wind report around 10:45 p.m. CDT in Porter County, Indiana.
Radar history of the July 19, 2017, derecho in the Midwest from 8:00 a.m. CDT to 10:00 p.m. CDT.
If you like a different view of this, University of Wisconsin research meteorologist Scott Bachmeier put together a spectacular loop of infrared satellite imagery with severe reports overlaid.
This satisfied the criteria to be dubbed a derecho, according to a 2005 study by Walker Ashley and Thomas Mote.
From the Spanish word for "straight," these convective windstorms leave swaths of wind damage at least 250 miles long and are most common in the summer months from the upper Midwest to the Ohio Valley.
(MORE: Summer Derechos Have a Favored Corridor)
While not a necessary condition, derechos often contain several reports of winds over 75 mph, capable of downing numerous trees, often toppling onto power lines, cutting power to hundreds of thousands – sometimes during a sweltering summer stretch.

Damage Highlights

What eventually became a derecho began in South Dakota with some eye-popping wind damage.
A wind gust of 100 mph was measured by a sensor in Hyde County. Several grain bins were destroyed, according to county law enforcement.
This cell then roared through Huron, South Dakota, with a wind gust to 83 mph accompanied by hail as big as tennis balls.
Near the South Dakota-Minnesota state line, a barn and grain bin were destroyed northwest of Lake Benton, and damage, possibly from an embedded tornado, was reported south of Marshall, Minnesota.
After that, wind damage became more widespread as the thunderstorm cluster developed several pronounced "bow echoes."
Widespread wind damage occurred in northeast Iowa early Wednesday evening. Wind gusts up to 70 mph downed numerous trees and power lines, damaged homes and flattened corn fields.
(MORE: It's Prime Time For Damaging Thunderstorm Winds in the U.S.)
The derecho then tracked into southwest Wisconsin, where a hangar at the airport in Prairie du Chien was damaged.
A 70-mph wind gust was measured at the Boone County Fairgrounds east of Rockford, Illinois, just before 9 p.m.
Weakening a bit, this cluster of thunderstorms then pushed through Chicagoland about an hour later, with a couple reports of tree damage on the west side of the metro area.
If that wasn't enough, a second thunderstorm cluster behind the derecho dumped torrential rain on already saturated ground in parts of southeast Minnesota and western Wisconsin overnight, triggering destructive flash flooding in Arcadia, Wisconsin that swamped roads, triggered mudslides and prompted evacuations.

How This Derecho Measures Up

This wasn't a particularly intense derecho – not close to the magnitude of the June 29, 2012 event which knocked out power to millions in the Ohio Valley and mid-Atlantic states. If derechos had their own Saffir-Simpson scale like hurricanes, this might be a Category 1.
This event seemed to be a light version of another derecho 34 years prior, which tracked farther north and was more organized than Wednesday's event, as detailed by NOAA's Storm Prediction Center.
This derecho is a good reminder why you should never ignore severe thunderstorm warnings and would be wise to take shelter when you hear a severe thunderstorm warning associated with a squall line as you would a tornado.
Always have multiple methods to receive National Weather Service watches and warnings – for example, The Weather Channel or Weather Underground smartphone app with alerts turned on, or NOAA weather radio.
Make sure the alert or alarm is turned on while you sleep so you can be awakened if severe weather, including a derecho, is a threat overnight.
Jonathan Erdman is a senior meteorologist at weather.com and has been an incurable weather geek since a tornado narrowly missed his childhood home in Wisconsin at age 7. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter.
MORE: June 2012 Derecho Damage (PHOTOS)

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

Exceptional Drought Returns to Montana and North Dakota for First Time in More Than a Decade

Chris Dolce
Published: July 20,2017

The country's worst current drought continues to intensify in the northern Plains where exceptional drought conditions have returned to parts of North Dakota and Montana for the first time in more than a decade.
Exceptional drought is the worst category on the U.S. Drought Monitor, which is updated weekly in a joint effort by multiple agencies.
About 6 percent of North Dakota and 1.5 percent of Montana are now in the exceptional category as of Tuesday.  The last time exceptional drought was analyzed in North Dakota and Montana was August 2006 and May 2005, respectively. Much larger portions of North Dakota and Montana, along with South Dakota, are also in severe to extreme drought.
(MORE: Here's What to Expect in the Fall)
Drought expansion in the northern Plains from early May into the middle of July. The worst drought is in eastern Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. (NDMC/NOAA/USDA)
The so-called flash drought has grown rapidly in the northern Plains since late spring, as the animation above shows.
Hot temperatures have baked the region in recent weeks, exacerbating the drought. Bismarck, North Dakota, saw high temperatures 90 degrees or hotter on 11 of the first 18 days in July, and three of those days topped the century mark.
For farmers and ranchers, the hot, dry conditions have had several consequences.
Large amounts of the spring wheat crop are in poor to very poor condition in South Dakota (74 percent), Montana (61 percent) and North Dakota (40 percent), according to the latest national drought summary.
The drought summary also said livestock water holes are drying up and cattle have lost weight due to a lack of grazing land.
In this July 13, 2017, photo, farmer John Weinand surveys a wheat field near Beulah, North Dakota, that should be twice as tall as it is. (AP Photo/Blake Nicholson)
Some counties in the Dakotas have been declared disaster areas, which will allow them to receive federal aid, the Associated Press reported.
In Montana, the Ft. Peck and Ft. Belknap Tribes have declared emergencies because of the drought. The Rocky Boy's reservation in north-central Montana is being affected by water shortages.
As you would expect, precipitation has been paltry in the northern Plains during 2017. Glasgow, Montana, Dickinson, North Dakota, and Minot, North Dakota, are seeing driest year-to-date numbers as of July 18, according to ACIS data. Numerous other cities are in the midst of a top-five driest start to the year.
Through Tuesday, Minot has seen less than three inches of total precipitation in this year – just 27 percent of the average for Jan. 1 through July 18.
A quick end to the drought is not expected in the next few months. An outlook issued by NOAA's Climate Prediction Center on Thursday said drought is likely to persist in much of the region into fall.
MORE: Photos of Drought Landscapes

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

Hundreds Evacuated from Western Wisconsin Town Due to Flooding; EF1 Tornado Confirmed in McGregor, Iowa

Sean Breslin
Published: July 20,2017

Hundreds of residents were evacuated from their homes in Arcadia, Wisconsin, Thursday morning as a swollen creek flooded the downtown area and closed several major roads.
The western Wisconsin town successfully completed all necessary evacuations Thursday morning, but water continued to rise at Turton Creek, according to WEAU.com. The floods forced authorities to close all major roads into the city, the report added.
(MORE: Where Damaging Storms Could Strike Next)
The Associated Press said the number of evacuees was well into the hundreds, and shelters were set up to house those pushed out of their homes.
"The Trempealeau River in Arcadia crested at its highest level since the September 2010 flood, 3.6 feet above flood stage early Thursday morning," said weather.com senior meteorologist Jon Erdman. "In nearby La Crosse, it's been the fourth-wettest year-to-date through June 19, over 9 inches above the average-to-date and just over 2 inches behind the record-setting pace of 1993, the year of the infamous Midwest flooding."
Flooding and mudslides were a widespread concern in the upper Midwest as storms pushed through Wednesday night and Thursday morning. In southeastern Minnesota, several roads were closed by floodwaters or mudslides, the AP also said.
A portion of Highway 95 in Wisconsin had to be shut down near Fountain City due to a mudslide.
Arcadia is a town of about 2,900 located some 40 miles south of Eau Claire.

Tornado Leaves Damage in McGregor, Iowa

The National Weather Service said an EF1 tornado hit the northeastern Iowa town of McGregor and left serious damage Wednesday night.
The walls of some buildings were blown over in the small city's downtown area, while other structures were knocked off their foundations, according to AP.
A man was taken to the hospital after winds blew his barn in Waukon over and pinned him inside, AP reports. Winds also toppled a semi trailer on Interstate 35 near Hanlontown.
All roads were shut down in McGregor as the town worked to clean up, and non-residents were advised to stay out of the city, according to WHO-TV.

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

Why Was Mark Zuckerberg's Meeting With Glacier Climate Expert Canceled?

Eric Chaney
Published: July 20,2
017
This past weekend, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg toured Glacier National Park in Montana as part of his personal challenge to visit every state this year.
He toured parts of the park on a red jammer bus on Saturday and visited Gracie, a "bark ranger" border collie who helps herd wildlife away from people at popular sightseeing areas.
But it was what he didn’t do that has some scratching their heads.
Though Zuckerberg posted on his own Facebook account that “The impact of climate change is very clear at Glacier,” a scheduled meeting with the area’s top climate expert was canceled at the last minute.
Three days before the tech leader’s July 15 visit to the park, research ecologist Daniel Fagre was told that a scheduled tour with Zuckerberg of Logan Pass on the Continental Divide was off, the Washington Post reports.
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg visited Glacier National Park last weekend but park officials canceled a planned meeting with the area’s top climate scientist.
(Screenshot courtesy of KTVQ)






















































“I literally was told I would no longer be participating,” said Fagre, who works for the U.S. Geological Survey.
 He said he asked the public-affairs officer who notified him why the briefing was being canceled.
“I’ve gotten nothing back. We’ve definitely been left in the dark.”
Representatives from Facebook told the Post that Zuckerberg’s visit was set up by the park, and “they determined who would participate.”
Heather Swift, press secretary for the Interior Department, told Mic that Zuckerberg’s visit “came at the height of the busy season.”
“After reviewing the event proposal which was sent to the National Park Service, the NPS and Interior made a number of park officials available for the personal tour,” she said. “Allocating government funds, personnel, and resources responsibly is the definition of good government and something we are dedicated to advancing at the department.”
Fagre told the Post that park officials initially reached out to him when they knew that Zuckerberg said he wanted to learn more about the retreating glaciers.
(MORE: Glaciers in Montana's Glacier National Park Could Vanish in Our Lifetime)
“We were just going to be answering questions,” Fagre said. “There was no preset agenda.”
Despite not meeting with Fagre, Zuckerberg did make climate changes, in particular, the park’s retreating glaciers, a major part of the post he made following the visit:
“In the last hundred years, the average global temperature has risen 1.5 degrees. But in the high elevations of Montana where Glacier is the temperature is warming at 3x the global average -- enough to melt glaciers
Since the 1850s, the number of glaciers here has gone from 150 to 25. In a couple of decades, there may not be any glaciers left in the park at all. The people here have no idea what the effects will be when glacier water stops flowing into the ecosystem.
Thanks to all the rangers for all you do and for showing me around such an amazing place. We need to make sure parks like Glacier -- and the planet overall -- are around for future generations to enjoy.”
MORE: World Glaciers Then and Now  

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

Turkey, Greece Earthquake Kills 2, Injures Hundreds

Ada Carr and Sean Breslin
Published: July 21,2017

An earthquake that struck Turkey overnight Thursday triggered a small tsunami after it created powerful tremors that were also felt in Greece.
The 6.7 magnitude quake killed two and injured at least 500 people, officials told the Associated Press. The epicenter was 6.2 miles south-southeast of the city of Bodrum, and the temblor hit at a depth of roughly 6.2 miles.
The two victims were tourists from Sweden and Turkey who were visiting the Greek island of Kos, the AP also said. They were crushed when a building collapsed on a bar. Their identities have not been released, but the victim from Sweden was identified as a 20-year-old male. Thirteen others were airlifted to hospitals in Athens, as well as Rhodes and Crete islands, because of serious injuries, the report added.
"We were asleep and we just felt the room shaking," British student Naomi Ruddock, who was visiting Kos, told BBC.com. "The room moved. Literally everything was moving. And it kind of felt like you were on a boat and it was swaying really fast from side to side, you felt seasick."
(MORE: Florida Sinkhole Widens, Residents Warned)

The Euro-Med Seismological Centre (EMSC) confirmed the tsunami and warned people to avoid beaches. Photos posted to social media showed water flooding buildings and structural damage left behind by the quake.
"There was banging. There was shaking. The light was swinging, banging on the ceiling, crockery falling out of the cupboards, and pans were making noise," Scottish diving instructor Christopher Hackland told the AP.
The earthquake struck an area near popular tourist resorts. It affected Mugla Province, which is close to resorts like the Marmaris Resort Hotel, the Daily Mirror reported.
"We woke up and the room was shaking," Fred Nathan, who was vacationing in Turkey at the time of the quake, told the Sun. "It was really disorientating. We got up to look out the room and it was still shaking. It seems like it was felt all over the island."
The EU has offered emergency equipment and personnel to help the area recover from the tremor, the AP also said.



The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

Missouri Inmates Scream for Help Amid Heat Wave In Prison That Lacked Air Conditioning

Eric Chaney
Published: July 21,2017

A video of prisoners yelling from the windows of a St. Louis city jail raised questions from family members and officials about the building's lack of air conditioning.
The Medium Security Institution, also known as "The Workhouse," was built in 1966 and can house over 1,100 inmates, but only a few sections of the institution are air-conditioned, Fox 2 Now reported, and prisoners must rely only on vented windows for air circulation.
On the video, the prisoners can be heard yelling "Help," "Help us," and "We ain't got no AC," from those windows.
(MORE: 50 Homes Destroyed by California's Detwiler Fire)
Prisoners at the Medium Security Institution run by the city of St. Louis can be seen yelling out the window as temperatures rise in the stifling building.
(Screenshot courtesy of KTVI-TV video)





































"This institution because it houses some 700 inmates ... it’s very hot in there," said the reporter who shot the video, Fox 2 Now’s Elliott Davis. "We’ve gotten a number of complaints. We talked to some people who have just been released about the conditions inside and they say that it’s absolutely unbearable."
One woman who was visiting her grandson at the facility told Davis her grandson claimed the temperature in the prisoner pods were 109 degrees, but Fox 2 Now said that claim has not been independently verified.
Data from a weather station located about a mile from the prison shows that although temperatures in the last seven days have averaged about 86 degrees Fahrenheit, highs have been in the upper 90s and even broke 100 on Thursday afternoon.
Jon Erdman, weather.com senior meteorologist, said temperatures will remain relatively high but may cool slightly.
"With average highs around 90 degrees, heat and humidity is the norm in late July in St. Louis," said Erdman. "Fortunately, there is a break ahead from the recent torrid heat wave, with highs settling into the low 90s early next week. This is what typically passes as relief this time of year."
City Corrections Commissioner Dale Glass told the Associated Press that he is developing a heat safety plan; the cafeteria and other common areas are serving as cooling stations.
A spokesman for Mayor Lyda Krewson told Fox 2 Now that staffers provide inmates with juice and ice several times a day to keep them cool.
Nonetheless, the situation at the prison has caught the attention of Missouri state lawmakers, the AP reported. State Rep. Joshua Peters (D) sent a letter Wednesday asking Missouri Speaker of the House Todd Richardson to create a commission to examine conditions at the St. Louis Workhouse.
MORE: Weirdest Weather Events on Earth

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

More Than 50 Homes Destroyed by California's Detwiler Fire

Sean Breslin and Pam Wright
Published: July 21,2017

A massive wildfire in the foothills west of Yosemite National Park has forced thousands to evacuate and destroyed more than 50 homes.
The blaze is burning in the Central Valley of California and has been named the Detwiler fire. Now 15 percent contained, the inferno has torched more than 115 square miles – larger than the city of Tampa – and destroyed more than 100 structures, according to Calfire. The smoke has drifted as far away as Idaho, the National Weather Service said.
The fire, which began Sunday afternoon, forced all 2,000 residents in the town of Mariposa to evacuate, unsure of the fate of their homes. As many as 1,500 structures are threatened, officials told the Associated Press. Up to 5,000 people overall have evacuated since the fire began burning, according to KPIX.
"The place is like a ghost town," Mariposa bed and breakfast owner Carol Dewey told the AP. "This fire has really devastated the area, business is just flat."
(MORE: Deadly Quake Strikes Greece, Turkey)
Officials told SF Gate that the blaze is threatening power lines that provide electricity to Yosemite National Park. The fire remains some 35 miles from the park, but Highway 140 from Mariposa into Yosemite Valley has been closed, park spokesman Scott Gediman told the AP.
The inferno led California Gov. Jerry Brown to declare a state of emergency on Tuesday, according to ABC News.
"I don't think we can emphasize enough how erratic and active this fire activity is – especially with this fire," Mariposa County Sheriff Doug Binnewies told KFSN-TV, as reported by ABC News. "It's done stuff that we've never seen before."
More than 3,800 firefighters are battling the wildfire, according to Calfire.

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

Western Pacific Will Roar to Life With First Typhoon of 2017 and a Weird Interaction Called the Fujiwhara Effect

Jon Erdman
Published: July 21,2017


The western Pacific is finally shaking out of its doldrums because of a pair of tropical cyclones that not only could strengthen, but could also perform a rare, bizarre, circular dance east of Japan called the Fujiwhara effect.
Currently, there are two active tropical cyclones well east of Japan. The westernmost one is named "Noru," with "Kulap" over 1,000 miles to the east of Noru. Another active tropical cyclone, 08W, will eventually push into northern Vietnam this weekend, bringing a threat of locally heavy rain.
Additionally, Tropical Depression 10W formed late Friday over the Luzon Strait. This tropical cyclone will remain weak but could enhance rainfall along the south coast of China, including Hong Kong, late Sunday into Monday.
(MORE: Hurricane Central)

Current Infrared Satellite Image
Noru and Kulap may not look impressive yet, but their future in the week ahead is meteorologically fascinating.
Noru is expected to eventually become a typhoon by early in the week but will meander over the next five days well east of Japan. Kulap, however, should make significant progress toward the west-northwest and may become close enough to begin an intricate, possibly fatal dance with Noru.
(FORECAST PATHS: Noru | Kulap)
Various numerical forecast models have suggested Noru and Kulap may, essentially, pinwheel around each other, something meteorologists call the Fujiwhara effect.
ECMWF (European) model forecast from July 20, 2017, of the potential Fujiwhara effect of tropical cyclones Noru and Kulap. Lower surface pressure is denoted by the deeper orange and red contours. Higher pressure is shown by the brighter teal, aqua colors.
Named for a Japanese researcher who discovered this in experiments with water in the early 1920s, the Fujiwhara effect details how two tropical cyclones 800 to 900 miles apart rotate counter-clockwise about one another. Think of the teacup ride at Disney or the Tilt-a-Whirl at your local county fair, but with tropical systems instead.
"The western tropical cyclone (Noru) is going to be the center of gravity, in a sense, where the smaller system (Kulap) is forecast to cyclonically orbit the larger system for a couple of days," said Dr. Michael Ventrice, meteorological scientist with The Weather Company.
Typically, the stronger storm will dominate the weaker, either fizzling it or merging with it altogether. In this case, Noru may be the stronger "survivor" of this.
Ventrice said he believes Noru's outflow will suppress convection for the smaller Kulap once they begin to interact.
Some forecast guidance suggests Noru may essentially ingest Kulap, then become an intense typhoon and still remain sitting in place well into the week ahead, if not the following week. It certainly makes for strange-looking model forecast tracks.
Why is this happening? Blame a clogged-up upper atmosphere.
"The reason for the stalling Fujiwhara tropical cyclones is likely tied to the development of a large blocking ridge over the north Pacific," said Ventrice. "This is going to stagnate flow over the northwest Pacific, which doesn't give this future pair – or merged cyclone – much steering flow."
Given this blocked atmosphere, we can't completely rule out Noru eventually creeping closer to Japan sometime near the end of July or early August.
Regardless, this long-lasting tropical cyclone will churn up impressive swells that may reach not just Japan's east coast, but may also propagate farther south and west.
Not to mention, the satellite imagery from this potential Fujiwhara effect may be among the most impressive weather imagery of 2017 to meteorologists and weather enthusiasts alike.
Tracks of 2017 western Pacific tropical storms through July 19. No typhoons had formed yet in 2017 as of this date.

Near-Record-Late 'First Typhoon'

If you haven't heard the word "typhoon" in a while, it's because there hasn't been one yet in 2017, and we're nearing a record wait for the year's first.
Through July 19, there have been only four tropical storms – Muifa in late April, Merbok in mid-June, Nanmadol in early July, Talas in mid-July – in 2017 in the northwestern Pacific Basin.
According to Dr. Phil Klotzbach, Colorado State University atmospheric scientist, three to four typhoons have typically developed by mid-July in an average year. Two of those typhoons would have reached at least Category 3 intensity in a typical year-to-date, as well.
Since 1950, only 1998 (Aug. 3) had a later "first typhoon of the year," Klotzbach noted.
"One of the reasons for suppression of the (Northwest Pacific tropical cyclone) season to date is that we've generally had sinking motion across most of the basin since early May," said Klotzbach.
Stronger-than-average trade winds, blowing east-to-west near the Philippines, Taiwan and the South China Sea, have also been in place since May, Klotzbach said. This increases wind shear, which tends to either prevent tropical cyclones from forming or rip apart those that have formed.
(MORE: Which Countries Get Hit Most by Tropical Cyclones?)
Klotzbach's calculations indicate roughly 80 percent of the year's activity, on average, still lies ahead in the planet's most active basin for tropical cyclones: the northwest Pacific Ocean.
Jonathan Erdman is a senior meteorologist at weather.com and has been an incurable weather geek since a tornado narrowly missed his childhood home in Wisconsin at age 7. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter.
MORE: Atlantic Basin Retired Hurricanes and Tropical Storm Names

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

'Ring of Fire' Weather Pattern Brings Dangerous Heat, Severe Storms and Heavy Rain

Chris Dolce
Published: July 21,2017

A ring of fire weather pattern continues to grip the U.S., resulting in dangerous heat and bouts of thunderstorms that may contain damaging wind gusts, hail, isolated tornadoes and heavy rain.
Though "ring of fire" isn't a formal weather term, it's sometimes used by meteorologists to describe a particular summertime weather pattern that sets up occasionally.
Here's how it works: Sinking air associated with a strong upper-level high-pressure system east of the Rockies leads to very hot temperatures near its core. Forming a ring around the high's clockwise flow are disturbances aloft that tap into moisture, resulting in bouts of storms near its periphery.
You can see the general setup for this week's ring of fire weather pattern in the graphic below.

Ring of Fire Weather Pattern
Here's what to expect.

Dangerous Heat

The worst of the heat into Saturday will grip areas from the central Plains into the mid-Mississippi Valley, parts of the South and mid-Atlantic states.
Excessive heat warnings and heat advisories have been issued by the National Weather Service in parts of the Midwest, South and East for a dangerous combination of hot temperatures and high humidity. This includes Kansas City and St. Louis, where heat index values are forecast to be 105 to 115 degrees again Saturday afternoon.

Heat Alerts
(MAPS: Forecast High Temperatures)
Highs in the middle to the upper 90s and a few 100s will be common from South Dakota to Missouri to parts of the mid-Atlantic states and the South through Saturday. Heat index values of 100 to 110-plus degrees are likely during the afternoon hours.

Forecast Highs This Weekend
Overnight temperatures won't provide much relief, with lows only dipping into the middle and upper 70s in the lower Midwest and South. A few spots will not even dip below 80 degrees.
Few daily record highs are forecast to be threatened since that bar is high now that we are in the climatological hottest time of year in most areas.
(MORE: July the Hottest Month in Most of the U.S.)
Cooler conditions will return to the Midwest and Plains by Sunday as the area of high pressure weakens. Temperatures will also retreat to near average in the mid-Atlantic by early next week.

Ring of Fire Storms

The periphery of the high will be the main focus for thunderstorms.
The northern Plains, upper Midwest, Great Lakes and mid-Atlantic will have the highest chance for bouts of severe storms, with damaging winds, hail and isolated tornadoes, as disturbances ride through the northern side of the high-pressure system. Flash flooding could also be problematic in those regions due to the several bouts of storms rolling through.
(FORECAST: Severe Weather Takes Aim on Midwest)

Saturday's Thunderstorm Forecast

Sunday's Thunderstorm Forecast
In the Southwest and Rockies, monsoonal moisture will continue to flow northward on the western periphery of the high. Those storms could result in more localized flash flooding.
(MORE: Threats From the Southwest Monsoon)
The Northeast, Gulf Coast and Southeast coast will also see isolated to scattered showers and storms at times through Sunday.

Rainfall Potential
MORE: Hottest and Coldest Temperatures Recorded in All 50 States

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

Relentless Severe Storms, Flooding Rain to Hammer Storm-Weary Upper Midwest Into Early Saturday; Threat Spreads to East Coast This Weekend

Brian Donegan
Published: July 21,2017

This relentless siege of severe thunderstorms and flooding rain will persist through the weekend from the storm-weary upper Midwest to the East Coast.
Multiple clusters of storms are currently dropping southeastward from the upper Mississippi Valley to the lower Great Lakes and parts of the Ohio Valley. These thunderstorms have a history of producing flash flooding, damaging wind gusts, large hail and even isolated tornadoes.
(MORE: View National Interactive Radar Map | Difference Between a Watch and a Warning)

Current Radar, Watches and Warnings
Early Friday evening, a severe thunderstorm with destructive winds over 70 mph moved through Elk Grove Village, Illinois, uprooting large trees throughout the village adjacent to O'Hare International Airport in Chicago's northwest suburbs. There were also reports of half-dollar-sized hail and standing water in the area.
Additionally, major flooding engulfed Schaumburg, Illinois, just west of Elk Grove Village, and on top of that, golf-ball-sized hail was reported in this village.
Friday afternoon, multiple brief tornado touchdowns were reported west of Kelliher, Minnesota. Grain bins and other farm buildings were damaged, according to a National Weather Service storm report.
Flash flood watches have been posted in parts of the upper Mississippi Valley. Several rivers are still above flood stage from western and southern Wisconsin into the north side of Chicagoland, including the Fox and Des Plaines rivers.

Current Flood Alerts
The setup for this latest round of severe weather involves an energetic jet stream punching across the upper Midwest and Northeast into this weekend. At the surface, hot, humid air is surging into the Midwest, Great Lakes and East – an ideal airmass for thunderstorms to develop, grow and persist.

Severe Weather Forecast

Saturday
  • Forecast: Clusters of strong to severe thunderstorms are expected, once again, from the upper Midwest to the Great Lakes, Ohio Valley and portions of the mid-Atlantic states. These clusters may last into the overnight hours in parts of these regions.
  • Threats: Damaging wind gusts and large hail are the primary threats, but an isolated tornado can't be ruled out. Localized flash flooding is also possible.
  • Cities: Detroit | Duluth, Minnesota | Cleveland | Pittsburgh | Washington D.C. | Baltimore | Philadelphia

Saturday's Thunderstorm Forecast
Sunday
  • Forecast: Scattered severe thunderstorms appear poised to fire up, yet again, from the Great Lakes into parts of the Northeast and mid-Atlantic states.
  • Threats: Damaging wind gusts and large hail are the main threats, though an isolated tornado cannot be ruled out. Localized flash flooding will again be possible.
  • Cities: Detroit | Cleveland | Pittsburgh | Philadelphia | Baltimore | Washington D.C.

Sunday's Thunderstorm Forecast
(MAPS: 7-Day U.S. Rainfall Forecasts)

Recap: Severe Weather in the Northeast, Flash Flooding in the Upper Midwest Thursday

Thursday, the National Weather Service confirmed two tornadoes touched down in Erie County, New York, and one touched down in Allegany County, New York.
An EF2 tornado ripped through Hamburg, some 10 miles south of Buffalo, with 105-mph maximum winds at about 12:30 p.m., followed by an EF1 tornado in Holland with 95-mph maximum winds roughly 20 minutes later.
The Allegany County tornado caused damage near the town of Angelica at approximately 1:40 p.m. and was rated EF1 with maximum winds of 95 mph.
(NEWS: State of Emergency Declared in Hamburg, New York, After Tornadoes Leave Damage)
Early Thursday morning, a cluster of thunderstorms triggered flash flooding and mudslides in parts of western Wisconsin and southeast Minnesota.
This followed immediately on the heels of Wednesday's derecho, which tore through parts of six states from South Dakota to northwest Indiana.

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MORE: Severe Storms in the Midwest, Northeast

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

This Date in Weather History for July 21,2017 from weatherforyou.com

Weather History
For Friday,July 21,2017
 
 
 
 
1911 - The temperature at Painter, WY, dipped to 10 degrees to equal the record low for July for the continental U.S. (The Weather Channel)
1934 - The temperature reached 109 degrees at Cincinnati, OH, to cap their hottest summer of record. The state record for Ohio was established that day with a reading of 113 degrees near the town of Gallipolis. (David Ludlum)
1975 - Six inches of rain fell across Mercer County, NJ, in just ten hours causing the worst flooding in twenty years. Assunpink Creek crested eleven feet above flood stage at Hamilton and Trenton, the highest level of record. Traffic was brought to a standstill, and railway service between New York City and Washington D.C. was cut off for two days. Flooding left 1000 persons homeless, and caused an estimated 25 million dollars damage. (David Ludlum)
1987 - Thunderstorms produced severe weather from Utah to North Dakota, spawning a dozen tornadoes in North Dakota. Thunderstorms in North Dakota also produced baseball size hail at Clifford which caused four million dollars damage, and high winds which toppled a couple of eighty foot towers cutting off power to the town of Blanchard. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data)
1988 - While cool air invaded the central U.S., unseasonably hot weather continued over the western states. The temperature at Spring Valley, NV, soared from a morning low of 35 degrees to an afternoon high of 95 degrees. Fallon, NV, reported an all-time record high of 108 degrees, and Death Valley, CA, reported their sixth straight day of 120 degree heat. (The Weather Channel) (The National Weather Summary)
1989 - Afternoon thunderstorms over Florida produced wind gusts to 92 mph at Jacksonville, damaging thirteen light planes at Herlong Field. Five cities in Texas reported record low temperatures for the date. Corpus Christi, TX, equalled their record low for the date with a reading of 71 degrees, and then tied their record high for the date that afternoon with a reading of 97 degrees. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data)

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Stormy,persistent weather pattern bleeding into a fourth straight month of soggy,deary weather for NYC area

Since the Spring 2017 season began,practically,the Jet Stream has been practically stuck in a pattern that has let the Eastern two-thirds of the US remain wet,stormy,raw and cool,although now that the 2017 Summer season has began,that may mean we here in the Northeastern US and the New York City area in particular are in for a stormy,soggy,steamy summer this year. Here's the High and Low Temperature and weather stats for the city of White Plains,NY for each day since April Fool's Day; April 1,2017,as of 12:30AM,EDT,July 20,2017 from weatherunderground.com







April 1:                    46/36          50/34               -4/+2
April 2:                    61/37          51/35             +10/+2
April 3:                    64/36          51/35             +13/+1
April 4:                    50/44          52/36               -2/+8
April 5:                    60/42          52/36               +8/+6
April 6:                    51/39          53/35                -2/+4
April 7:                    49/39          54/36                -5/+3
April 8:                    54/38          54/36                 0/+2
April 9:                    67/33          55/37              +12/-4
April 10:                  73/41          55/37              +18/+4
April 11:                  78/48          56/38              +22/+10
April 12:                  72/52          56/38              +16/+14
April 13:                  62/44          57/39                 +5/+5
April 14:                  63/41          57/39                 +6/+2
April 15:                  60/40          58/40                 +2/0
April 16:                  85/51          58/40              +27/+11
April 17:                  70/54          59/41              +11/+13
April 18:                  63/45          59/41                +4/+4
April 19:                  53/41          59/41                 -6/0
April 20:                  66/46          60/42                +6/+4
April 21:                  52/48          60/42                -8/+6
April 22:                  56/46          60/42                -4/+4
April 23:                  65/43          61/43                +4/0
April 24:                  62/40          61/43                +1/-3
April 25:                  56/50          61/43                -5/+7
April 26:                  63/53          62/44                +1/+9
April 27:                  67/57          62/44                +5/+13
April 28:                  83/57          62/44              +21/+13
April 29:                  84/62          63/45              +21/+17
April 30:                  64/48          63/45                 +1/+3
May 1:                     70/46          63/45                +7/+1
May 2:                     74/60          64/46              +10/+14
May 3:                     63/45          64/46                 -1/-1
May 4:                     61/39          64/46                 -3/-7
May 5:                     60/48          64/46                 -4/+2
May 6:                     64/52          65/47                 -1/+5
May 7:                     54/46          65/47                -11/-1
May 8:                     55/43          65/47                -10/-4
May 9:                     58/42          65/47                 - 7/-5
May 10:                   61/45          65/47                  -4/-2
May 11:                   60/42          65/47                  -5/-5
May 12:                   61/43          66/48                  -5/-5
May 13:                   54/44          66/48                -12/-4
May 14:                   64/50          66/48                 -2/+2
May 15:                   66/52          66/48                   0/+4
May 16:                   77/55          67/49               +10/+6
May 17:                   85/57          67/49               +18/+8
May 18:                   95/71          67/49               +28/+22       (Record High Set)
May 19:                   90/62          68/50               +22/+12
May 20:                   66/48          68/50                  -2/-2
May 21:                   67/47          68/50                  -1/-3
May 22:                   59/51          69/51                -10/0
May 23:                   70/54          69/51                 +1/+3
May 24:                   70/56          70/52                   0/+4
May 25:                   58/54          71/53               -13/+1
May 26:                   74/54          71/53                +3/+1
May 27:                   73/53          71/53                +2/0
May 28:                   70/56          72/54                -2/+2
May 29:                   57/53          72/54               -15/-1
May 30:                   60/54          72/54               -12/0
May 31:                   75/55          72/54               +3/+1
June 1:                     79/55          73/55               +6/0
June 2:                     74/50          73/55               +1/-5
June 3:                     72/50          73/55                -1/-5
June 4:                     70/54          74/56                -4/-2
June 5:                     64/56          74/56              -10/0
June 6:                     56/50          74/56              -18/-6
June 7:                     68/50          75/57                -7/-7
June 8:                     70/50          75/57                -5/-7
June 9:                     81/47          75/57               +6/-10          (Record Low Set)
June 10:                   85/57          76/58               +9/-1
June 11:                   92/66          76/58             +16/+8
June 12:                   93/69          76/58             +17/+11          (Record High Set)
June 13:                   94/70          77/59             +17/+11          (Record High Set)
June 14:                   85/59          77/59               +8/0
June 15:                   77/57          77/59                 0/-2
June 16:                   68/58          77/59                -9/-1
June 17:                   74/68          78/60                -4/+8
June 18:                   86/72          78/60               +8/+12
June 19:                   84/70          78/60               +6/+10
June 20:                   85/65          78/60               +7/+5
June 21:                   82/64           79/61              +3/+3
June 22:                   85/71           79/61              +6/+10
June 23:                   82/72           79/61              +3/+11
June 24:                   82/72           80/62              +2/+10
June 25:                   81/63           80/62              +1/+1
June 26:                  78/58           80/62                -2/-4
June 27:                  79/59           80/62                -1/-3
June 28:                  79/57           81/63                -2/-6
June 29:                  82/68           81/63               +1/+5
June 30:                  87/69           81/63               +6/+6
July 1:                    84/68           81/63                +3/+5    
July 2:                    88/70           81/63                +7/+7      
July 3:                    87/67           81/63                +6/+4
July 4:                    85/65           81/63                +4/+2
July 5:                    84/66           82/64                +2/+2  
July 6:                    78/64           82/64                 -4/0
July 7:                    80/66           82/64                 -2/+2
July 8:                    84/66           82/64                +2/+2
July 9:                    81/63           82/64                 -1/-1
July 10:                  84/62           82/64                +2/-2
July 11:                  83/71           82/64                +1/+7
July 12:                  88/72           82/64                +6/+8
July 13:                  90/70           83/65                +7/+5
July 14:                  66/62           83/65                -17/-3
July 15:                  82/64           83/65                 -1/-1
July 16:                  84/64           83/65                 +1/-1
July 17:                  82/66           83/65                 -1/+1
July 18:                  86/70           83/65                 +3/+5
July 19:                  92/72           83/65                 +9/+7




-Highest Temperature: 95 degrees on May 18
-Lowest Temperature:  33 degrees on April 9
-# of Highs above normal:   63 days
-# of Highs right at normal:  4 days
-# of Highs below normal:   43 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees above normal: 18 days
-# of Highs at least 10 degrees below normal: 10 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees above normal: 12 days
-# of Highs at least 15 degrees below normal:  3 days
-# of Highs at least 20 degrees above normal:  6 days
-# of Highs at least 20 degrees below normal:  0 days
-# of Highs at least 25 degrees above normal:  2 days
-# of Highs at least 25 degrees below normal:  0 days
-Rainfall: 15.42 inches
-# of Days of Measurable Precipitation:       46 days
-# of Days of No Measurable Precipitation:  64 days       (including the last 5 straight)